Trish Lim

Trish Lim

Proponent of Local Weaving Industry in PH

Perhaps the most difficult thing to do in the wake of a disaster is to rebuild—a home, a livelihood, a community. However, it is not impossible, and nowhere is this more evident than in the efforts of Trish Lim and her team at Woven.

The social enterprise was set up by co-founders Trish Lim and John Francia in the aftermath of Super-Typhoon Yolanda in 2013. Working with survivors in Samar, they discovered the beauty of banig mats in a town called Basey. The pair decided to set up Woven in the hopes of empowering the banig weavers – paraglara in the local dialect – as entrepreneurs who could rebuild and reshape their own livelihoods.

Trish now aims to take Woven worldwide, wanting more people to know about the talent of Filipino artisans and to prepare the weavers for the next steps in building a business out of their craft. They’re also exploring other crafts communities around the Philippines in order to work with new materials and more artisans from different cultures.

Women
of the World

Perhaps the most difficult thing to do in the wake of a disaster is to rebuild—a home, a livelihood, a community. However, it is not impossible, and nowhere is this more evident than in the efforts of Trish Lim and her team at Woven.

The social enterprise was set up by co-founders Trish Lim and John Francia in the aftermath of Super-Typhoon Yolanda in 2013. Working with survivors in Samar, they discovered the beauty of banig mats in a town called Basey. The pair decided to set up Woven in the hopes of empowering the banig weavers – paraglara in the local dialect – as entrepreneurs who could rebuild and reshape their own livelihoods.

Trish now aims to take Woven worldwide, wanting more people to know about the talent of Filipino artisans and to prepare the weavers for the next steps in building a business out of their craft. They’re also exploring other crafts communities around the Philippines in order to work with new materials and more artisans from different cultures.

Perhaps the most difficult thing to do in the wake of a disaster is to rebuild—a home, a livelihood, a community. However, it is not impossible, and nowhere is this more evident than in the efforts of Trish Lim and her team at Woven.

The social enterprise was set up by co-founders Trish Lim and John Francia in the aftermath of Super-Typhoon Yolanda in 2013. Working with survivors in Samar, they discovered the beauty of banig mats in a town called Basey. The pair decided to set up Woven in the hopes of empowering the banig weavers – paraglara in the local dialect – as entrepreneurs who could rebuild and reshape their own livelihoods.

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Trish now aims to take Woven worldwide, wanting more people to know about the talent of Filipino artisans and to prepare the weavers for the next steps in building a business out of their craft. They’re also exploring other crafts communities around the Philippines in order to work with new materials and more artisans from different cultures.

Trish has since fully invested her time and efforts into Woven’s mission of uplifting the lives of traditional artisans, but she admits that her greatest obstacle has been her fear of failure. It helps that she is surrounded by people who constantly support her and push her to do her best for the weavers. Through it all, she’s been blessed with inspiration from a lot of strong women, especially her mother Irene Lim, who reminds her to never turn her back on her creative side.

With Woven, Trish has been able to do so much for the community of women in Basey. She’s seen them grow from earning an average income of 650 Php/month to more than twice that amount, and she’s determined to help them earn even more from their craft. She says that the best part of it all is hearing from the members of the community about how Woven has helped change their lives.

Trish now aims to take Woven worldwide, wanting more people to know about the talent of Filipino artisans and to prepare the weavers for the next steps in building a business out of their craft. They’re also exploring other crafts communities around the Philippines in order to work with new materials and more artisans from different cultures.